css

WHAT IS CSS

Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) is a style sheet language used for describing the presentation of a document written in a markup language like HTML. CSS is a cornerstone technology of the World Wide Web, alongside HTML and JavaScript.

CSS is designed to enable the separation of presentation and content, including layout, colors, and fonts. This separation can improve content accessibility, provide more flexibility and control in the specification of presentation characteristics, enable multiple web pages to share formatting by specifying the relevant CSS in a separate .css file, and reduce complexity and repetition in the structural content.

Separation of formatting and content also makes it feasible to present the same markup page in different styles for different rendering methods, such as on-screen, in print, by voice (via speech-based browser or screen reader), and on Braille-based tactile devices. CSS also has rules for alternate formatting if the content is accessed on a mobile device.

The name cascading comes from the specified priority scheme to determine which style rule applies if more than one rule matches a particular element. This cascading priority scheme is predictable.

The CSS specifications are maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). Internet media type (MIME type) text/css is registered for use with CSS by RFC 2318 (March 1998). The W3C operates a free CSS validation service for CSS documents.

 

BENEFIT OF CSS3

Consistency –

By making one change to your website’s CSS style sheet, you can automatically make it to every page of your website. The bigger your website, the more time CSS saves you. And not only does CSS save time, it also ensures that your web pages have consistent styling throughout your site.

Bandwidth Reduction –

When CSS separates your website’s content from its design language, you dramatically reduce your file transfer size. Your CSS document will be stored externally, and will be accessed only once when a visitor requests your website. In contrast, when you create a website using tables, every page of your website will be accessed with each visit. Your reduced bandwidth needs will result in a faster load time and could cut your web hosting costs.

Search Engines –

CSS is considered a clean coding technique, which means search engines won’t have to struggle to “read” its content. Also, using CSS will leave your website with more content than code – and content is critical to your search engine success.

Browser Compatibility –

The recent arrival of Google® Chrome is further evidence that today’s Internet users have more browser options than ever before, which makes browser compatibility a major issue for your website. CSS stylesheets increase your website’s adaptability and ensure that more visitors will be able to view your website in the way you intended.

Viewing Options –

Another common web design concern is the increasing need to make websites available for different media. CSS can help you tackle this challenge by allowing the same markup page to be presented in different viewing styles —— for example, you may create a separate stylesheet for print or for a mobile device.

 

CSS SYLLABUS

  1. Introduction to CSS: Why Use CSS?
  2. CSS Syntax
  3. HTML 5 and CSS
  4. Set Up Web Pages with CSS
  5. Styling Text, Font, and Properties
  6. Styling Page Backgrounds
  7. Styling Lists in CSS
  8. Using CSS Classes and IDs
  9. Using Borders and Height and Width CSS Properties
  10. CSS Pseudo Elements
  11. Positioning Elements
  12. Validating CSS and HTML
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